Share

Let’s Talk About Vaginismus

What is Vaginismus?

Vaginismus is a condition that involves involuntary muscle spasms in the pelvic floor muscles. These involuntary muscle spasms happen when an object (finger, tampon, or medical instrument) and/or a penis attempts to penetrate the vagina. Vaginismus doesn’t interfere with sexual arousal, but it may prevent penetration. Dyspareunia and Vaginismus  Dyspareunia is the medical definition of painful sexual intercourse. And it’s often confused with vaginismus. Dyspareunia can occur due to:
  • cysts
  • pelvic inflammatory disease
  • vaginal atrophy
Types of vaginismus:- Primary Vaginismus/ Lifelong Vaginismus This occurs when the vagina owner experiences pain whenever something attempts to enter their vagina, including during penetrative sex, it is impossible to insert anything into the vagina. This is a lifetime condition in which the pain has always been present. It also makes it extremely difficult to use a tampon and/or undergo a gynecological exam.  Secondary Vaginismus/ Acquired Vaginismus It has not always been present and can occur at any stage of life. Here, the vagina owner has had sex before without experiencing any pain, but later it becomes extremely difficult or impossible to engage in penetrative sex.  It usually occurs from a specific event, such as an infection, menopause, a traumatic event,  relationship issues, surgery, the development of a medical condition, or childbirth. Situational  Vaginismus This type of Vaginismus is situation-oriented, it only occurs in specific situations for instance: it may happen during sex but not during gynecological exams or tampon insertion.  Vaginismus Symptoms The symptoms may vary between individuals. They may include:
  • Painful intercourse (dyspareunia) 
  • Penetration being difficult or impossible and/or difficulties and pain during insertion of a tampon or a menstrual cup.
  • Long-term sexual pain with/without a known cause.
  • Pain during a gynecological examination.
  • Generalized muscle spasm or breathing cessation during attempted intercourse.
  • Fear of pain or sex, and loss of sexual desire.

Causes of Vaginismus

There is no known cause of exactly why some people experience vaginismus. In some cases, no direct cause can be found. Certain factors that may contribute to vaginismus are:
  • Anxiety disorders.
  • Childbirth injuries, such as vaginal tears.
  • Prior surgery.
  • Fear of sex or negative feelings about sex, perhaps due to past sexual abuse, rape, or trauma.
  • Past sexual abuse or trauma
  • Past painful intercourse
  • Emotional factors
  • Relationship problems, for instance: having an abusive partner or feelings of vulnerability
  • Childhood experiences, such as the portrayal of sex while growing up or exposure to sexual images
  • Infection, such as a urinary tract infection (UTI) or yeast infection
  • Menopause
  • Inadequate foreplay and insufficient vaginal lubrication
  • Medication side effects

Vaginismus Treatment

Vaginismus cure is still unknown and without treatment, it can lead to frustration and distress, and it may get worse. Treatments are available in a combination of the following:- Exercise: These include muscle contraction and relaxation activities, or kegel exercises, to improve control of the pelvic floor muscles. Education: Providing knowledge about sexual anatomy and the sexual response cycle can aid the individual to understand the pain and what their body is going through. Emotional exercises: This aids an individual in identifying, expressing, and resolving emotional factors that may be contributing to their vaginismus. Reducing sensitivity to insertion:  The person is encouraged to touch the area as close as possible to the vaginal opening every day without causing pain, moving closer each day. When they’re able to touch the area around the vagina, they’ll be encouraged to touch and open the labia. The next step will be the insertion of a finger. Insertion or dilation training: Once the individual can do the above-mentioned exercise without pain, they’ll use a plastic dilator or a cone-shaped insert. If they can insert this without pain, the next step is to leave it in for 10-15 minutes, to let the muscles get used to the pressure.  Shivtensity provides you with psychosocial-medico-legal consultations and a safe space to talk about your concerns, we provide you with a judgment-free zone and empathy.
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
WhatsApp
Pinterest
Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Latest articles

+1 234 56 78 123

Get your first free online consultation

Bibendum neque egestas congue quisque egestas diam. Laoreet id donec ultrices tincidunt arcu non sodales neque

Get your first free online consultation

Bibendum neque egestas congue quisque egestas diam. Laoreet id donec ultrices tincidunt arcu non sodales neque

+1 234 56 78 123

Get your first free online consultation

Bibendum neque egestas congue quisque egestas diam. Laoreet id donec ultrices tincidunt arcu non sodales neque

+1 234 56 78 123